Washington Post

'Winnie-the-Pooh' just entered the public domain. Here's what that means for fans.

Luke McGarry began drawing a nude Pooh Bear as soon as he heard the news. The original, nearly 100-year-old "bear of very little brain" from the Hundred Acre Wood had rung in this new year by entering the public domain. Now quite humbly, McGarry's creative appetite felt rumbly.

The Los Angeles-based artist sat and penned his Winnie-the-Pooh idea in four panels, announcing the 1926 character's free-for-all status as of Jan. 1, with a winking if satirically speculative interpretation: "Disney still owns their version of me. ... But as long as I don't put a little red shirt on, I can do as I like" - a reference to how the character's attire regularly began to be depicted beginning in the 1930s.

McGarry waited a day to post his colorful cartoon on social media. Later he checked his accounts: "I didn't think it was going to blow up like it did." On Twitter alone, the illustration received nearly 40,000 likes. The artist realized his Pooh toon could bring some cash flow. "Had I anticipated there being any demand, I would've probably had prints done in advance."..

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