Washington Post

Academics want to preserve video games. The game industry is fighting them in court.

Foto: Issei Kato/Reuters/Ritzau Scanpix

For decades, champions of the video game industry have touted gaming's cultural impact as the equal of literature, film and music. Traditionally, the classic works from those mediums have been preserved for study by future generations, and amid gaming's global rise in relevance, a group of video game scholars and advocates is pushing to preserve the game industry's historic titles and legacy in a similar fashion. In the process, though, the would-be preservationists have found a number of challenges that include, ironically, legal opposition from video game companies and the Entertainment Software Association (ESA), a trade organization that lobbies on behalf of game publishers.

A 2018 report by the Association of Research Libraries found that archivists are "frustrated and deeply concerned" regarding copyright policies related to software, and they charge the current legal environment of "imperiling the future of digital memory." The obstacles archivists face range from legal restrictions around intellectual property to the technological challenges of obtaining or re-creating versions of the various consoles, computers and servers required to play various titles published over the years. Not only must the games be preserved, they also need to be playable, a quandary akin to needing a record player to listen to a rare vinyl album...

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