Washington Post

Automakers are grappling with a changing market. The Trump administration hasn't made it easier.

Steve Carlisle, president of Cadillac at General Motors, speaks next to Cadillac XT6 sport utility vehicles at the 2019 North American International Auto Show in Detroit on Jan. 13, 2019. Foto: Bloomberg photo by Daniel Acker The General Motors Cadillac XT6 sport utility vehicle is unveiled at the 2019 North American International Auto Show in Detroit on Jan. 13, 2019. Foto: Bloomberg photo by Daniel Acker

Motown's glitziest annual tradition kicked off Sunday night as Cadillac, one of the most venerable brands in the business, took the cover off of its newest vehicle: A three-row, luxury SUV it calls the XT6. Rolling out to a cheery soundtrack, fog and roving spotlights, the XT6 debuted with a flourish as Cadillac introduced it as "a vehicle that offers room for new possibilities."

But behind the confident razzle-dazzle, a darkening cloud hangs over Cadillac's parent company, General Motors, as well as the broader auto industry. Caught between political and economic crosswinds, car makers in America face what could be the most challenging year ahead since the auto bailout...

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